Research and canada and dating violence

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Teens who experience violence in dating relationships are more likely to suffer from domestic abuse as an adult, according to a new study from the University of Calgary.The study, led by Faculty of Social Work researcher Deinera Exner-Cortens and published in the Exner-Cortens says her study serves as a wake-up call that dating violence amongst teens needs to be taken more seriously.“When I talk to adolescents, they may not recognize that what they’re experiencing is dating violence,” Exner-Cortens said.

Although dating violence occurs at any stage of life, most of the Canadian research published to date has focused on high school, college or university students (Wekerle , 2009)(Straus, 2004)(De Keseredy & Kelly, 1993).Five years after they were first victimized, the study found female victims had almost 1.5 times greater risk for experiencing physical violence from an adult partner; male victims had almost twice the risk for experiencing romantic violence.READ MORE: New Brunswick introduces legislation to curb intimate partner violence The findings were compared to a group who did not experience dating violence, but who were otherwise similar in terms of risk history.“For a long time adolescent romantic relationships weren’t a focus in research because people thought that they didn’t really matter for well-being,” Exner-Cortens said.While some forms of abusive behaviour, such as acts of physical assault, could result in charges under the Criminal Code of Canada, others, such as ridiculing or otherwise being verbally abusive, are harmful but not criminal offences.Dating violence has become an issue of increasing concern to researchers and practitioners over the past three decades.

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